An inspiring place to blog (or write) #Writing

From Eclecticity Light’s long-running series: A Clean, Well-Lighted Place to Blog …

The pen is mightier than the keyboard, #Writing

At last, proof for the offspring that you need to take hand-written notes. This is an interesting article on how taking hand-written notes results in deeper learning than taking similar notes using a keyboard. The researchers conclude that rich sensory-motor experiences seem to facilitate learning, or put simply, it is the physical movement of the […]

When science gets politicised – @mattwridley

“In 2013, you may recall, the European Union banned some uses of neonicotinoid insecticides to save bees. The verdict on this policy has now come in, from the commission’s own Joint Research Centre (JRC)…Its conclusion is that the ban has been disastrously counterproductive, resulting in an increased use throughout the continent of more damaging pesticides, […]

Andrew Marr

The dark-shadowed sweet shop of the internet – @AndrewMarr9 #Writing

An Oakeshottian* conservative’s view of the world, per Andrew Marr: “Superabundance is foisted upon us as the only sure route to happiness. And from the dark-shadowed sweet shop of the internet to the imminent arrival of driverless cars, we prefer the untried to the tried every time.” A thought-provoking column from Andrew Marr in yesterday’s […]

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science by Diane Stanley

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science – @brainpicker

The BrainPickings blog highlights this engaging children’s book about mathematician, computing pioneer (and much more), Ada Lovelace: Sounds like it should be required reading to small children everywhere. By the way, reading this I learn that Ada Lovelace was the daughter of the poet Lord Byron; something I feel I should have known already.

The rehabilitation of Michael Gove

Since leaving office, in the bizarre aftermath of the Brexit vote, Michael Gove has returned to his prior career as a writer, writing a regular column for the Times. His two latest contributions are excellent, objective observations on current events. The first, in the immediate aftermath of the Westminster attack, contemplates how best to respond […]

Food miles – not what they seem

An interesting post from Oliver Riley on the Adam Smith Institute blog: Save The Environment – Don’t Buy Local. “Those who encourage us to buy locally often do so with the view that reduced transport distances will result in less CO2 emissions. Seems simple, but what such people neglect is the fact that the majority […]

Praise of the commonplace

Kurt at Cultural Offering points to the concept of the commonplace book. It’s a powerful idea. I started mine – inspired, I think, by the same underlying sources of TheCramped.com and the Ryan Holiday post – only in October 2015. I use one of my Monsieur Notebooks and, though I number the pages, I haven’t yet […]

Alcohol and caffeine built society

Kurt’s Cultural Offering reveals why the best ideas come at the end of a fine dinner – alcohol and caffeine built society. “If alcohol inspired agriculture, caffeine jumpstarted progress. While the Chinese drank caffeinated tea as far back as 3,000 B.C., the discovery of coffee is dated to 15th century Yemen. Trade with the Arab world […]

Namesakes

I’ve just discovered another namesake. The last one I stumbled across appeared to own a tank. This Andrew Munro is merely a very talented photographer. Check him out, here.  

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