The right to be read

How to enjoy the right to be read

How do you capture attention when your audience is overwhelmed with social feeds, emails and noise? When B2B means busy-to-busy? Earn the right to be read.

Power of storytelling

The repetition of stories – @thisisseth

What happens to us matters a great deal, but even more powerful are the stories we repeat about what happened.

language and perception

How our words shape our reality – @vivian_giang

Does the language we use affect our thinking and how we perceive reality? Vivian Giang has a thought-provoking article on fast Company.

Fairy tales and stories

What can content marketing learn from fairy tales?

Can traditional fairy tales teach us anything about changing behaviour through narrative? After all, that’s the ultimate goal of content marketing.

The Neuromarketing reading list – @RogerDooley

Over on the Neuromarketing blog, Roger Dooley has complied the Ultimate Neuromarketing Reading List. I’ve read a few of these, but found many more to add to my own Must Read list. Worth a scan for all marketers. Photo by Nicole Honeywill on Unsplash

Trust and the attention asset – @thisisseth

Here’s a great post on trust and the “attention asset” from Seth Godin. A few simple principles:If you’re not measuring attention in dollars and cents, you don’t know what it’s worth.If you’re treating everyone the same, you’re wasting attention.If you’re burning trust to get more attention or more action, you’ve wasted both of them. … […]

Where do stories come from?

We know that stories work at a physiological level; our bodies respond to stories as if we were actually experiencing the events for real. In turn, and importantly, this means we can learn from them, as from a real experience, but with lower risk and in less time. That suggests that, like domestic animals,  stories […]

Philip Pullman on storytelling

Via the Hammock Papers comes this YouTube video of Philip Pullman delivering the 2018 Annual Lecture of the Blake Society. It’s well worth a watch and, if anything, I found the Q&A more interesting than the talk itself. Points of interest include this, on critics: [27:38] – “There’s something a bit creepy about reviewers who […]

The Inky Fool on English place names

Silent for too long, the wonderful Inky Fool returns with a handy guide to decoding English place names: Borough = Fortification Burn/Bourne = Stream Bury = Manor or estate, i.e. a big farm By = Viking town (that’s why they’re only in the North in the old Danelaw) Read the full article, here.   Photo by Reuben Hustler on Unsplash

Evil laughs and free-riders – how to craft your villain

All stories need a villain, an antagonist. This piece from the British Psychological Society tells you how to create yours. one of the core traits a villain should show is a low “welfare trade-off” ratio: they are free-riders who cheat and steal, taking from their community while contributing nothing. Such behaviour is undesirable for societies […]

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